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 In response to the ban on Free Fire in India, Singapore expresses its concern

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 In response to the ban on Free Fire in India, Singapore expresses its concern
 In response to the ban on Free Fire in India, Singapore expresses its concern

In response to the ban on Free Fire in India, Singapore expresses its concern- Singapore has raised concerns with India about a gaming app called “Free Fire” owned by technology company Sea Ltd (SE.N), in the first sign of diplomatic intervention after the ban scared investors. The restriction caused the market capitalization of the New York-listed Southeast Asian corporation to plummet by $16 billion in a single day, and investors are concerned that India would extend the ban to Sea’s recently launched e-commerce app, Shopee.

Despite the fact that Sea has its headquarters in the affluent city-state, Singapore has asked Indian authorities why the app was targeted in a broadening crackdown on Chinese apps, according to the sources of Reuters, which include two Indian government officials. According to one of the Indian officials aware of the diplomatic endeavor, Singapore had inquired if the app had been “blocked arbitrarily.”

 In response to the ban on Free Fire in India, Singapore expresses its concern

According to two Indian sources, the complaints raised with India’s external affairs ministry were forwarded to the information technology (IT) department, which imposed the restriction. Because of the sensitivity of the negotiations, the individuals declined to be identified. They said they had no idea how or if the Indian government planned to respond to Singapore’s concerns.

Singapore government and Sea spokespeople did not immediately reply to emailed demands for comment. India’s IT department, external affairs ministry, and the primary government spokesperson’s office all declined to comment.

According to Reuters, India prohibited “Free Fire” this month as part of a group of 54 apps it believes are transmitting user data to Chinese servers. China responded by expressing grave worry and expressing the hope that India would treat all foreign investors equally. find out more

“We do not transfer to, or store any data of our Indian users in China,” Sea told Reuters at the time, adding that it was a Singapore firm that conformed with Indian law. India’s original ban of 59 Chinese apps, including TikTok, was increased this month to a total of 321, including Free Fire, following a border conflict with China in 2020.

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